Newsletter June 2019

*How to co-create experiences at the time of the Digital?
 
Future Narratives and Immersive Experiences”  symposium at the Film University Babelsberg KONRAD WOLF on May 22 2019 brought together interdisciplinary co-creators in the audiovisual sector, companies dealing with media, VR / AR / MR, games, 3D sound, the staging of productions, communication, heritage and cultural institutions or other fields of activity with the urge of delivering high-quality storytelling in the digital era.

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*How to unlock the reconciliation potential of the de-militarized buffer zone (DMZ) between North Korea and Soth Korea?

DMZspace aims at turning the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) into an eco-peace projective space.
In June 2019 we visited with a field trip and workshop the Civilian Control Line area at DMZ, investigating how to unlock the reconciliation potential of this de-militarized buffer zone.

* How to re-signify controversial memory landscapes?
 
El País, the Spanish daily newspaper, has published two articles in Spanish and English on “Deep Space”.
 
“Deep Space” explores how to re-signify controversial memory landscape by means of collaborative, artistic and hybrid processes. To stir the conversation around these topics, on 5 June 2019 Hybrid Space Lab contributed to the panel discussion at the German cultural institute GOETHE Institut together with the photographer Miquel Gonzalez, the historian Prof. Dr. Gutmaro Gómez Bravo and the journalist Emilio Silva, one of the founders of the Association for the Recovery of Historical Memory in Spain.

Together with Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam we are planning three workshops and a mobile academy on controversial heritage.

in a globalized world, the polyphony of voices gaining and demanding recognition generates the necessity and the possibility to reconsider contested heritage. The collective reckoning with controversial history and the processes of re-signification and restitution deal with complex issues that have to account for a multitude of claims. We, therefore, need a fresh, radically innovative outlook with a solutions-oriented approach to address the various forms of contested heritage – be they objects, monuments, sites – in a way that is fit for the 21 century.