B.A.N.G. design

Design
Strategies

B.A.N.G. Design deals with the complexity of our globalized and ‘glocalized’ world.
Design strategies for B.A.N.G.: the fusion of Binary, Atoms, Neurons, and Genes.

Increasingly complex challenges require a collaborative interdisciplinary approach, a hybrid approach. B.A.N.G. Design as strategy incorporates elements and processes from very diverse fields, not always perceived as compatible by todays design practice.

By using concepts from one field and trying them out in another, B.A.N.G. Design methods enable to approach the issues we deal with from new perspectives, in order to reframe future challenges.

B.A.N.G. Design is an interface to the future as it provides creative instruments for developing future visions. B.A.N.G. Design develops methods for dealing with the geometrically accelerating pace of developments and with permanent change.

lectures
workshop
24 June 2016

@ Design by Culture
Berlin

Subject to the exponential technological acceleration and challenged by alarming ecologic and social changes design is becoming increasingly important in shaping our hybrid world. The increasingly complex challenges require an integrative collaborative interdisciplinary, a hybrid, approach.

B.A.N.G. design incorporates elements and processes from very diverse fields. By using concepts from one field and trying them out in another, B.A.N.G. design methods enable to approach the issues we deal with from new perspectives, in order to reframe future challenges.

B.A.N.G. design develops methods for dealing with the accelerating pace of developments and with permanent change as well as with the complexity of our globalized and ‘glocalized’ world. Hybrid Design is an interface to the future as it provides creative instruments for developing future visions.

Today, we are experiencing a merging of creative fields. The universal instrument of the computer provides a bridge which connects very different creative fields such as music, graphic design, architecture, object design, video…

The use of the computer for the sake of its primary quality – as a tool for processing complexity – enables us to design and control complex processionary and dynamic network systems. Supported by these technologies, we are therefore experiencing a hybridization of environments, objects and services.

B.A.N.G. design deals with the design of physical spaces, artifacts and media networks in an integrated way, considering objects, services and environments within networked systems of production, distribution, use and recycling. While industrial design concentrated on industrially mass-produced objects and followed the logic of the industrial age, Hybrid Design corresponds to today’s technological and cultural paradigms: The focus is shifting from designing products intended for consumption to programming – or ‘designing’ – processes for networks of people, enterprises and organizations – processes which represent a pool of possible sustainable futures.

Due to such a shift from mass production to individual customization and network-assisted production, the consumer/user–product relationship is being rapidly transformed. ‘Prosumers’ become involved in the design and manufacture of products, allowing them to be made to her/his individual specifications. These developments demand a new approach to design: from the design of singular prototypical objects for industrial mass production to the design of processes of production and distribution in interaction with users.

Converging technologies (such as BANG: Bits Atoms Neurons and Genes) are enabling us to generate materials with processionary qualities that serve as building blocks for objects and environments that interact with their users.B.A.N.G. design approaches technological developments from the perspective of the designer by ‘inhabiting technology’, i.e. transforming such technological developments in order to accommodate the way we want to live.

Embedding design discourse in an interdisciplinary context in this way can strengthen reflections on the role of the designer in relation to the shaping and development of our environment.