Think Tank

THINK
TANK

Voiced Spaces
Rotterdam
7\11\2019

City to Go
Berlin
15\7\2019

City Making Lab
Berlin
2019\2020

Hybrid Heritage
Rotterdam
2019\2020

Heritage Tools
Madrid
6\6\2019

Diplomacy Lab
Brussels
7\2\2019

Water Conscious Fashion
Berlin
16\1\2019

Future Heritage
Dortmund
24\1\2019

GRÜNtopia
Berlin

22\6\2018

Technology & the City
Amsterdam
15\6\2018

Digital Diplomacy
Den Haag
2\2018

NatureTecture
Shenzhen

01\2018

SHAReCONOMY
Berlin
7\7\2017

Future Diplomacy
Berlin
7\10\2016

Co-Curating
the City

Berlin

14\10\2016

Embassy Lab
Berlin, Dusseldorf, Munich
2015\2016\2017
\2018\2019

Fabric
documenta 14
Athens
8\4\2017

Design Strategies
Berlin
24\6\2016

CRISIS design
Berlin
2015\2016 

Smart City
Governance

Berlin

21\5\2015

Concept
Research
Strategy
Theory

Copy Culture

Design culture is obsessed with authenticity. Copying is often deemed reprehensible, and borrowing another’s idea or incorporating elements of his or her work into one’s own is viewed as a sign of creative impoverishment. But is this right? What’s wrong with interpreting someone else’s creation? Musicians have been quoting each other’s work for centuries – why shouldn’t the same thing happen in other creative disciplines? Where does  quotation end and copying begin?

Businesses and creators diligently protect their creative, technical and technological property – rightly so, as large sums are often invested in their development. But is intellectual property protection appropriate in an age of digital distribution, when it’s difficult to identify a product’s author, maker or inventor? And in a culture in which quotation and copying have long led to enrichment and innovation, should these acts be made impossible?

Lecture, Hybrid Culture, Dutch Design Foundation, 27 September 2011, @ Beijing Design Week, Beijing, P.R. China

 

Design culture is obsessed with authenticity.

City Making in the Digital Age

Digitalization transforms our cities, with far-reaching efforts towards technology-powered increased efficiency, sustainability and at times participation. This raises new questions on privacy, data governance and (digital) design, historically unaddressed by city planning, architecture, civil society and governance. With cities worldwide striving to earn a “Smart City” reputation, it is however disputed who exactly benefits from these concepts.

Centering the empowerment of the city user, the Smart Citizen, it is urgent to approach and steer technological developments to meet citizens’ needs and desires, supporting our visions of how we want to live in our cities!

Lectures, Discussion @ Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society, Berlin, 21 Februari 2019